7.3 Church History
7.3.1 Masters Level
Courses
7.3.2 Th.M./Ph.D. Level...

7.3.2 Th.M./Ph.D. Level Courses


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CH 723  Readings in the History of American Evangelicalism
Purpose:

  • To understand the major philosophical and theological currents that shaped American Evangelicalism
  • To examine the writings of American Evangelicals within the historical contexts of the eighteenth through twenty-first centuries 
  • To highlight ways in which the history of American Evangelicalism influences the development of global Christianity

Topics covered include post-puritanism, revivalism, fundamentalism, the battle for the Bible, missions, prophecy movement, Pentecostalism, and neo-Evangelicalism.
  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Jue.

CH 732  English Puritan Thought
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to reading English Puritan texts in historical context
  • To give students an understanding of how English Puritan thought connected both to previous medieval and patristic discussions, and also to the theology of the European Reformation
  • To facilitate critical discussion of the historical events (political, cultural, intellectual) which helped to shape and inform the thought of the English Puritans

Topics covered include the impact of William Perkins; issues in Puritan ecclesiology and pastoral theory; the growing radicalism of the 1640s; the relationship between Reformed Orthodoxy and Puritan thought; and the impact of the Great Ejection of 1662 on English Reformed theology.
  Winter term. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.

CH 763  The Life and Thought of John Calvin
Purpose:

  • To familiarize students with the life and writings of John Calvin through intensive study and discussion of his writings
  • To help students to read and appropriate the theology of the past for theological reflection today 
  • To encourage students to read John Calvin for themselves

Topics covered include the significant life events that impacted Calvin's theology, Calvin's view of Apologetics, the doctrine of Scripture, doctrine of the covenant, Calvin's view of the extent of atonement, and Calvin's view of the Lord's supper in the context of Luther, Bucer, Zwingli, and Bullinger.
  Winter term. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Lillback.

CH 783  God and Scripture in the Era of Reformed Orthodoxy (ca. 1560-ca. 1680)
Purpose:

  • To familiarize students with debates concerning the doctrine of God and the doctrine of Scripture in the era of Reformed Orthodoxy
  • To encourage students to explore the relationship between God, revelation, and Scripture within an historical context 
  • To facilitate critical discussion of significant issues in the relevant primary and secondary sources

Topics covered include the medieval background; the essence and attributes of God; Trinitarianism in the seventeenth century; the formalization of the Scripture principle; the attributes of Scripture; principles of interpretation; and the crisis in biblical authority in the late seventeenth century.
  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.

CH 831  The Doctrine of the Church in Reformed Theology
Purpose:

  • To familiarize students with ecclesiology (the doctrine of the church) in the Reformed tradition through readings in historical, biblical, and systematic theology
  • To acquaint students with the theological foundations, principles, and practices that support, guide, and embody Reformed ecclesiology 
  • To provide students with resources to answer the ancient and modern challenges of sacramental, ecumenical, consumeristic, and post-modern views of the church
  • To train students to articulate and defend more thoughtfully and winsomely the conviction that the church is “the kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ”

Topics covered include the relationship between ecclesiology and biblical and systematic theology, church power, church and state, church and the Kingdom of God, as well as readings in James Bannerman, John Calvin, William Cunningham, Herman Bavinck, G.C. Berkouwer, Charles Hodge, John Murray, Thomas Peck, John Owen, Herman Ridderbos, Stuart Robinson, James Thornwell, Geerhardus Vos, and Thomas Witherow.
  Fall semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Troxel.

CH 863  Scottish Presbyterianism
Purpose:

  • To enable students to understand how and why Presbyterianism developed in the manner in which it did
  • To enable students to read for themselves some of the great foundational writings of the early Scottish Presbyterians 
  • To encourage students to reflect upon the relationship of historic Presbyterianism to the contemporary world

Theologians covered include John Knox, David Calderwood, Samuel Rutherford, and George Gillespie.
   Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.

CH 872  The Life and Thought of John Owen
Purpose:

  • To familiarize students with the life and writings of John Owen through intensive study and discussion of his writings
  • To help students to read and appropriate the theology of the past for theological reflection today 
  • To encourage students to read the Puritans for themselves

Topics covered include the social and political background, Arminianism, Socinianism, Trinitarianism, christology, church and state issues, and Owen’s significance in the ongoing development of Reformed theology.
  Winter term. Mr. Trueman.

CH 883  The Life and Thought of Francis Turretin
Purpose:

  • To examine the history and theology of Francis Turretin (1623-1687) through a careful reading of Turretin’s Institutes of Elenctic Theology (the primary Systematic Theology textbook of Old Princeton)
  • To introduce the historical and theological context of seventeenth-century Protestant Scholasticism and its relation to the sixteenth-century Reformers 
  • To enable students to reflect upon the Reformed theological tradition and its value for the contemporary church

Topics covered include the background of Post-Reformation Scholasticism, theological prolegomena, the doctrine of God, the decrees of God, man’s free will, justification, covenant theology, ecclesiology, and eschatology.
  Fall semester. Mr. Jue.

CH 891  Reformed Confessions and Catechisms
Purpose:

  • To familiarize students with the confessional and pedagogical literature of the Reformed tradition
  • To facilitate students’ understanding of these documents in their historical context 
  • To encourage students to interact with these documents as items of perennial interest Topics covered include the nature and function of confessions and catechisms, the various historical backgrounds and contexts for the documents, early Reformed confessions, the Three Forms of Unity, and the Westminster Standards.

  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.

CH 901  The History of North American Eschatology

Purpose:

  • To examine the history of eschatological thought from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries in North America
  • To help students analyze how the historical context shaped the development of eschatology 
  • To introduce students to the history of biblical exegesis on the Apocalypse

Topics covered include the background of Augustinian eschatology and seventeenth-century millenarianism, Colonial apocalyptic expectations, the postmillennialism of Jonathan Edwards, the millennium and the War of Independence, the eschatology of Old Princeton, the rise of Dispensationalism, biblical theology and eschatology, and post-modern eschatology.
  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Jue.

CH 943  Studies in Old Princeton Theology
Purpose:

  • To deepen students’ knowledge of Old Princeton’s theological contribution
  • To explore the writings of the Princeton theologians in the context of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries 
  • To investigate the theology of Old Princeton within the wider history of the Reformed tradition

Topics covered include theological method, the influence of Common Sense Philosophy, doctrine of Scripture, Calvinism in North America, confessionalism, Presbyterian polity, and Reformed biblical theology.
  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Jue.

CH 951  Old Religion in the New World: Transatlantic Puritan Theology
Purpose:

  • To introduce students to the British context out of which colonial Puritanism emerged
  • To explore the transatlantic dimension of colonial Puritanism through the cross-fertilization of theological ideas 
  • To examine how colonial Puritan theology distinguished itself in a North American context

Topics covered include the social and political background of the seventeenth century, covenant theology, soteriology, ecclesiology, sacraments, and eschatology.
  Fall semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Jue.

CH 961  Readings in the History of Reformed Thought
Purpose:

  • To deepen students’ knowledge of Reformed theological writing in historical context
  • To familiarize students with significant documents and theologians of the Reformed tradition 
  • To help students think historically about theology and their own tradition

Topics covered include the doctrine of God, salvation, the sacraments, church and state, and eschatology. Texts will be drawn from Calvin, the Puritans, the Reformed Orthodox, the Dutch Reformed tradition, and various other Reformed traditions.
  Spring semester. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.


CH 972  Life and Thought of Martin Luther
Purpose:
     The purpose of this course is to examine the life and teaching of Martin Luther through studying texts written by Luther and his contemporaries which illuminate the intellectual development and theological contribution of the German Reformer.  Topics include the controversy over indulgences, the nature of justification, the dispute with Erasmus, the Marburg Colloquy, and the development of Lutheran theology in the 1530s and 1540s.  
  Fall semester, two hours. (Not given in 2012-2013). Mr. Trueman.

Courses listed for other majors which may be counted as major courses for the Th.M. degree in Church History: NT 982, ST 741, ST 773, ST 791, ST 803, ST 901, ST 932, ST 972, AP 903.